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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
just left the white house after meeting with the president. and did i mention that michael moore is here tonight? this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> my going is to get to an agreement with the president of the united states that addresses this problem. >> the fiscal cliff end game comes into play. tonight, john boehner meets the president at the white house. congressman barney frank is here with reaction. >>> republican bullies in the senate get their way. >> i didn't want to see a confirmation process that was very prolonged. >> jonathan alter and michael steele on the ugly politics that took down susan rice. >>> the economic policy institute destroys governor rick schneider's best right to work talk point. >> all you have to do is look to indiana. >> they've gotten thousands of jobs coming to indiana. >> indiana's had a strong experience. they did similar legislation. >> tonight, michigan's favorite son, michael moore, on schneider's portrayal and the way forward for workers in the heartland. >>> the 12-12-12 concert raised a ton of money for sandy relief. but house r
harmony of mississippi! (laughter) >> indiana didn't take michigan's jobs, all right? michael moore ate them! (laughter) >> jon: now that both indiana and michigan have the exact same right to work laws, though, how are you going to differentiate yourselves? >> right to work? jon, come on, that is so 11 months ago. indiana's latest pro-business measure is the workplace safety act. any business that relocates here gets to dump whatever they want wherever they want for free. lakes, rivers, wetlands. they take all factories toxic slurry. >> jon: you call that workplace safety act. >> studies show poisoning the environments cuts workplace beaver bites down to zero. no more raccoon maulings or slipping on the o *d toad on a factory floor. dow chemical is very interesting. >> that's no match for michigan's latest pro-business measure. work force education. >> jon: yeah, i'm going to guess that's not really educating workers, is it? >> it's the opposite! if your business needs cheap workers to pull long hours, michigan will turn its schools into factories! no more recess, kids, now it's a five
. with millions of americans unemployed this simply makes no sense. stephen moore, senior writer for "the wall street journal." how are you doing, steve? good morning. >> hi, bill. bill: they're saying 43,000 jobs because of this. what, a latex glove gets taxed? i thought it was just like on mri machines and big items like that? >> actually, no. thank you for doing this segment because a lot of americans don't realize when the president calls for all the new taxes in the fiscal cliff negotiation, mr. president we already have a big tax increase that will hit on january 2nd. that of course is the obamacare taxes. you mentioned one of them, the tax on medical devices and medical equipment, bill, which i agree with, congressman price. that will reduce innovation and will reduce the kind of invention and new products we need to keep people healthier. in addition to that, bill, don't forget there is something called 3.8% investment tax surcharge in the obamacare bill that starts in january. one of the things that the president says is a little misleading i will only raise tax rates back where they
scared to death. >> reporter: sam moore surveyed the damage in his neighborhood in pennington, texas. >> this used to be a really big- - as you can see by the size of the slab, used to be a huge feed store. it wasn't a weak building at all. it was a well-built building, and it just-- you see what it did to it. it's amazing. >> reporter: emergency personnel here got some much-needed help from the indiana national guard today. troops were deployed here to help check on stranded motorists and check on shut-ins. jim? >> axelrod: troy kehoe in bloomington, indiana, for us, thank you. david bernard is the chief meteorologist at our cbs station in miami. he's following the storm system. david, as the storm tracks north, who has the most to worry about? >> well, there is a lot of real estate to cover, jim. let's start by looking at the satellite and radar combined this evening, and we have a big shield of snow this afternoon covering areas from detroit to cleveland, right through northern pennsylvania, now pushing into western portions of new york. south of there, all along the i- 95 corrido
're not in the union. stephen moore, "wall street journal." who would be next? >> there are a number of states neighbors to michigan really looking at this legislation. i'll name a few to you, bill. pennsylvania, ohio, west virgina, states like that are competing against southern states. remember a lot of jobs and a lot of manufacturing has moved from the midwest, the kind of rust belt of america to the south in part because those southern states are right-to-work. can i mention one other thing if i could, bill, about this issue that is important? bill: sure. >> there is so much misinformation what it means to be a right-to-work state. i want your viewers to know this, if you're a right-to-work state it does not ban unions, bill. simply means that workers who work for a unionized company have the right as an individual to join the union or not. it does not ban unions. bill: to be more specific, if you're not a member of a union, in michigan you're required to pay union dues. >> that is exactly right. bill: under this law you're no longer required to pay dues for something you're not gets servi
this weekend. we reached out but haven't heard back yet. steve moore is here with us. if the strike happens, some estimates say $1 billion per day hit to the economy. >> yeah, there's no question. if you -- you used the right word, cripple the economy. the ports in this country are the backbone of our trade, both export and imports and i've read estimates of $100 billion or more comes in and out. so it cook devastating, and reverberate throughout the economy. retailers, wholesalers. food distributors, everybody would be affected by the strike if it goes forward. >> exactly what do the unions want and what is management willing to do? how far apart are the two groups? >> it's interesting. they're not really -- normally in a wage dispute with the union,ettes it's about wages and benefits but in this case it's not. what the unions are objecting to, according to the media reports i've been seeing, is they object to new kinds of work rules and new kinds of efficiencies that the port systems want to put in place to make the ports more productive, lower costs. that's happening -- you cover these m
't heard back yet. steve moore is here with us. if th strike happens, some estimates say $1 billion per day hit to the economy. >> yeah, the's no question. if you -- you used the right word, cripple the economy. the ports in this country are the backbone of our trade, both export and imports and i've read estimates of $100 billion or more comes in and out. so it cook devastating, and reverberate throughout the economy. retailers, whesalers. food distributors, everybody would be affected by the strike if it goes forward. >> exactly what do the unions want and what is management willing to do? how far apart arehe two groups? >> it's inresting. they're not really -- normally in a wage dispute with the union,ettes it's about wages and benefits but in this case it's not. what the unions are objecting to, according to the media reports i've been seeing, is theybject to new kinds of work rules and new kinds of efficiencies that the port systems want to put in place to make the ports more productive, lower costs. that's happening -- you cover these markets every day. it's happening in every industr
jeffrey moore. >> i did very well. >> you knew the indicators that are used to define recession. they're not cherry-picked. that are very specific. they've been defining them for decades, almost a century. >> what are they? >> they are production, income, sales, broad sales and employment. that is it. and when they peak collectively, that is a telltale sign that you have turned the corner on the business cycle and are headed down. >> what about the -- production has come down. i agree with you. income has come down. sales have come down. employment, however, is still rising. >> well, first off, on production and income, you have not seen the simultaneous decline we have now in over half a century. you've never seen it outside of a recession. and you've always seen it inside of a recession and both of those peaked in july, broad sales thus far the peak is in july. that's the high point. we'll see what happens. unemployment is still rising. that's your best argument -- >> employment is still rising. >> jobs growth is still positive. now, that is not inconsistent with a recession. in thr
's bring stephen moore in. i think you're going to disagree with my notion that government can be all that helpful to our runner. that government can be helpful other than by getting out of the way. i think you're going to suggest lower taxes, lower spending, fewer regulations. for the sake of this argument and analogy, accept that taxes are going up. there are many soifr who is argue that there is not a role for government in this let the markets and private industry handle it. but they haven't, and we've got substandard roads and bridges and electricity and broadband infrastructure. all of this means we're less attractive to business. do you accept that the government has a role to play in the rebuilding of america's infrastructure? >> well, sure. and by the way, i love your optimism, ali, i hope you're exactly right about 2013 and 2014. we've been spending money on the programs. a lot of the school buildings, i mean that's been going on in a large magnitude in the united states. what i like and where we might find some agreement, you know, i do think private-sector dollars can lead
journal" editorial writer steve moore and chrystia free land. i asked ken how you convince lawmakers that infrastructure money is well spent and how do you ensure that the money is, in fact, well spent? >> i think you have to have firm regulatory oversight. it's not something you can just spend the money and walk away from. but there are the electricity grid, water, aging bridges. there's so many things hardening our cyber infrastructure against terrorist attacks and such. many, many things. elt doesn't have to be public money. there's no reason we have to be so statused about this that we can't have more private money. we have telephone companies, cable companies, we did the railroads that way. it doesn't all have to be public money. >> steven is nodding his head vigorously. you're going to disagree with the assertion that government can be helpful. a new analogy. that government can be helpful other than by getting out of the way. i think you'll suggest lower taxes, lower spending, fewer regulations. but let's for the sake of this argument and this analogy accept taxes are going up
? >> brian: who is that next guest? i believe it's ryan moore, the ceo and founder of rebo innovation. >> yeah. >> gretchen: he's here to show you how you can work out from the comfort of your own desk. how did you come up with the idea? >> close friend of ours passed away from cancer. we were inspired to join 100-mile, three mountain bicycle challenge. but we needed to train. we were having a hard time running our business, getting our work done while cycling indoors and training. so we looked for a device that would allow to us mount or computers, but nothing existed, so we made our own. after training for the event exclusively using what we made and riding it, we thought hey, this is a great idea. it really works. >> steve: it really does work. and brian was talking earlier about how when he works out at the gym, he's always reading. but what i've noticed is, and this is great because you've got a laptop here -- is it's often shaky. so it's hard to read. if you come up with this desk thing, foamy and i'm sure nasa helped you develop it, the computer stays absolutely rock steady whi
? joining me now, senior economics writer or for "the wall street journal" steve moore. steve, thanks for making it in today. >> hi, jamie. we're having a white christmas in chicago. so it is a lot of fun. jamie: i know chicago, burr. the numbers are also pretty chilling for retailers who do what percentage of their business during the holiday season? >> you know, those months of november and december are absolutely crucial, jamie, for the retailers. about 40 to all their business all year is done in those two holiday months. so it's, not very good news that the retail numbers came in, you called them lackluster. and that's probably putting it charitiably. this was the worst year since 2008. it is actually, surprising, jamie, because if you look at some other indicators, consumer confidence had actually bumped up a little bit in the last couple months. we have, i wouldn't read too much into this because other indicators of the economy are looking up right now. jamie: so do you think it's an anomaly that it isn't going up? is it an indication if we go over the fiscal cliff there's conc
would your benefits cut by moore thank a quarter. -- by more than a quarter. unless we act, this is not a self-correcting problem. now, there are other things that we need do around social security such as raising the cap on the a income that's taxed. but those who say putting off questions about social security or medicare to some other day refuse to also recognize the reality that none of this self-corrects and that the sooner we start down the path on reform, the sooner that we can make sure the promise of these programs will last. but again, instead of worrying about the potential of a 25% cut for folks who are 46 years old in social security, they talk about the fact that, yes, that there may be some slight cutback in immediate benefits. not, though, 25%, not 3%, not 1%, but .3% decrease in the amount of increase each year. and even with that, there are ways, if we use this tool, to make it more fair and balanced. because we must make sure that we protect the most vulnerable in our society. i was part of a group -- and, again, the presiding officer, i believe, was supp
of the processors and storage. by the way in storage there's something called moore's law in processing, storage the greater change is double every nine months than 18 months. twice the rate. so but the point is in the technology world you have to think about the companys producing innovation not producing products and services in order to stay ahead of the curve. >> jonathan, you want to pick up on this? >> i'm sorry. i'm a philosopher. i don't know how to innovate. and what strikes me about innovation, of course, is that -- this is something the president gave us a good example a few minutes ago, retroviruses and basic medical science turned into very important, as part of the treatment, and understanding of hiv-aids. years later. if you think of the internet it was packet switching, then turned into the internet and finally the web. there's a myth about americans that we only care about application n fact we are the most effective basic science producers in history. now, the founders, to use an overused cliche, had innovation in their d.n.a. the articles of confederation required standards of
an introduction, shelly moore capito. >> i knew following mario was going to be a problem. but anyway, thank you all for being here. i want to thank the families and the young children who are here. i come from a different viewpoint. i do have a grandchild and i see this through her eyes and the debt that christie talked about is very daunting for her. but i'm also in that middle generation where i'm caring for my parents. they're heavily reliant on medicare and social security and me and our family to support them. and i understand how important those safety net programs are for them. but for these children, if we don't take the opportunity that we have this week, this month, to look at those programs so that when these children are the age of my parents and their children are trying to figure out how to meet those heavy costs of their health care, we will have missed an opportunity that would be unforgivable. and so for my parents, my grandchild and for me and for all the parents and grandchildren and caregivers in this country, we must come with this commonsense plan, we can't ask people arou
moore's academy award winning documentary, "bowling for columbine." current tv presents this important film tonight at 6 eastern followed immediately by an encore presentation. ♪ >> i never get what i really want. i always get a lot of stupid toys or a bike or toys or something like that. >> what it is that you want? >> announcer: stephanie miller. >> real estate. >> stephanie: it is the "stephanie miller show." welcome to it. 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. everybody is -- we were in a hard break at the bottom of the hour, but everybody just observed a moment of silence for the victims in connecticut. joe biden was speaking yesterday about -- do we have that him talking about -- what is it the gun control commission. >> the president is absolutely committed to keeping his promise that we'll act and act in a way that -- as he says if we can only save one life we have to take action. >> stephanie: and jay carney yesterday as well. >> everyone in merck has a steak in doing something to end the scourge of gun violence in this nation. >> stephani
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)